Mortgage and Portfolio Loan Guide

Finally! Mortgage Loans for Bad Credit

mortgage loans for bad credit 1

Yup, you’re approved!

Applying for mortgage loans when having bad credit can be uncomfortable to say the least. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard the same story. A great family, with strong stability fell on hard times. They had to let their house go because of a serious injury, downsizing of a company, or loss of a loved one. In many cases those folks get back on their feet within 6 months to a year, and would like to buy a home again. However, with the lending guidelines in today’s world, that can be quite a challenge.

The good news is there are lenders out there that will treat you like a human being. Mortgage loans for bad credit do exist, and I’ll tell you how to find them WITHOUT having to jump through a million hoops.

How bad can your credit be?

Well, it depends…

Credit scores and time since the blemish really aren’t the main factors. The main factor is “why”. What’s the story behind the credit problem? Were you blatantly irresponsible? Or did you have a rough patch?

Let’s say you had a foreclosure a year ago because your company outsourced your job after they cut your pay 50% a year before they let you go. You were in a position that you genuinely couldn’t afford to make your payment and had no choice but to foreclose. As long as you can some how prove the course of those events taking place, and show a previous history of being financially responsible, you definitely have a chance to get approved.

Now, if you “gave your house back to the bank” because you noticed home values were declining, that’s another story. It has to make sense. There needs to be proof that there was a legitimate reason for the cause of the credit issue.

Who can offer bad credit loans?

The vast majority of lenders, especially big banks, and mega-originators, only write “A-paper”. They are (for the most part) extremely conservative with what they will approve, and who they will approve. You want to look for a small to mid-size local company. Maybe a credit union or a company who has some sort of partnership with a credit union. Small local banks are good too.

Why? These types of companies are typically privately held. They are more likely to be committed to building and strengthening relationships in the community, and bend over backwards to meet the needs of their clients. I’m not suggesting that there aren’t awesome people that work at BIG companies. All I am saying is that their hands are tied many times because of the company they represent.

There is something special about reaching out to someone and telling them you can help when no one else would even give them a second look because of their bad credit. Really giving folks a second chance without making them wait 2-7 years to get back on their feet.

What can you expect with these in-house loans?

  • Primary residence only.
  • Usually 10% down will be required. Gift okay.
  • The interest rates may be higher than typical loans.
  • No monthly mortgage insurance even if you put less than 20% down.
  • Paying points may be required.
  • Okay on purchase or refinance. Even cash-out is okay in some cases!

Getting a loan like this isn’t for everyone. Typically it’s a short term fix for people with unique situations, but know that home-ownership is right for them. Once they’re back on their feet within a couple years, it would most likely make sense to refinance into the loan that meets the needs of their updated circumstances. Did you know this type of opportunity was available right now?

portfolio mortgage lendersI invite you to reach out to me.

Get your questions answered.

You won’t be talking to some newbie or intern, you’ll be talking with Adam Lesner directly. We don’t get everyone approved, but we do our best to find the right loan if it makes sense.

pre approved home loan

Check out video below:

Adam Lesner NMLS 198818 | Mackinac Savings Bank NMLS 401686 | Main offices in Michigan, Massachusetts, and Florida. Also offering financing in most states across the US including (but not limited to) Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Washington DC, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, Wisconsin.  

 


Repair your credit today with Lexington Law


How to Build Credit to Buy a House

Prepping Your Credit for a Mortgage

When you’re finally ready to become a homeowner; it is certainly an exciting and anxious time! The last thing anyone wants to do is find out last minute that there is a blemish on their credit report that cannot be resolved quickly enough to close on your dream home in time. In Part 1 of the “keeping your home loan process simple” series we looked at all the basics of the puzzle on a mortgage approval. In this portion we’ll look at the credit piece in detail order to keep potential home buyers in the loop on what to be ready for.

Your credit report is your opportunity to show your credibility to your lender. It serves as a reference of the liabilities you have paid in the past and present.

Your credit report is heavily considered with your approval because it gives an indication as to how you treat the responsibility of paying items you’re liable for. If you have 0 previous derogatory marks, and you have 3-4 tradelines that you have been paying on time for 24 months; your credit should be in good shape. There is no question that everyone’s situation is unique in many ways.

 

Understanding how information on your credit is evaluated can “make you” or “break you”. If you can anticipate issues that you may encounter; you’re really putting yourself a step ahead of the game. Below are a few explanations of common terms to help decipher what a credit report shows. 

Score

There are loan programs available that allow you to buy a home with a credit score below 640. However, the objective is simplicity. So with that in mind; a good goal would be to make an effort to be at 680 or higher as a middle score (as reported by Experian, Equifax, and Transunion). Anything 740 and higher is considered excellent.

History

The history on your credit report is just as important of a factor as your credit score. Anything derogatory in the last 10 years is likely to be available to the eyes of the lender.

Tradeline

Any recurring debt that is reported by the credit bureaus on your credit report is a tradeline. Examples include but are not portfolio loan past credit issueslimited to car loan, student loan, personal loan (from bank), home loan, and recreational vehicle loan. Rent payments (although important to keep record of and pay on time) and utility bills are examples of liabilities that are typically not reported on credit reports.

Debt-to-income Ratio

Your lender will use your credit report as a starting point to help determine what your debt to income ratio is. Your lender will take into account the liabilities that show on your credit report, and compare that with how much your verifiable monthly income is. Of course your new mortgage, property taxes, property insurance, and mortgage insurance (if applicable) will be factored into the equation. You certainly can expect  any child support, alimony, and 401k loans to be factored into your debt as well. 

Example: Mr. Homebuyer has 3 credit cards that total 100/month, a mortgage of 900/month (including taxes and insurance), and makes 4,000/month. Mr. Homebuyer’s debt to income ratio is .25 (or 25%). Debt / Income = Debt to income ratio. To keep things simple you want to aim to be below 43% debt to income ratio.

Derogatory Items

Derogatory items that show on your credit report will hurt your scores, and create challenges when getting a mortgage. Late payments, collections, tax liens, bankruptcies, foreclosures, short-sales, and repossessions are some examples of derogatory items that can be found on your credit report. The more recent those items have been reported; the more negatively your scores will be affected. Here are some of the most common issues and tips on how to address them.
 
  • Late payments. Any liability that is reported on your credit report showing a late payment of 30 days or more will have a negative impact on your scores. Upholding your end of the bargain (paying on time) is a significant part of establishing good credit. 
  • Collections. These can be a result of an unpaid cell phone bill or even a medical bill you forgot to pay. Really, almost anything that you agreed to pay for in any fashion can be sent to a collection agency if it remains unpaid. It’s in your bestDoes a Portfolio Loan make sense for you- (1) interest to get collections resolved as quickly as possible once you’re aware of them. In some cases collection agencies will accept less than what is owed in order to resolve the debt. However, paying the collection won’t necessarily improve your credit. To improve your scores after paying the collection; request a “letter of deletion” from the collection agency. Basically it’s a letter confirming the collection shown on your credit report has been paid in full, and will be deleted from your credit report. If you can convince the collection agency to do that then make sure you ask for a copy as well. You’ll want to send a copy of that to all 3 credit bureaus. Some collection agencies will do this; others won’t. It’s definitely worth a try. You may need to talk to a manager and get it escalated. If you have 1 or 2 medical collections that are only a few hundred dollars you don’t need to lose sleep over that. Medical collections are not treated as severely as regular collection (depending on the size of the medical collection).
  • Tax liens. If you have taxes that you owe the IRS they will issue a lien, and report that to the credit bureaus if they are not paid by the due date. The best thing to do is pay your taxes on time because if there is a lien outstanding; the IRS may start tacking on interest to the balance that is owed. Any tax liens outstanding will hinder your ability to obtain home financing until that has been paid in full. You’ll need to provide your lender with proof from the IRS that it’s paid in full and clear.
  • Bankruptcy. There are two most commonly used bankruptcy types that consumers use; chapter 7 and chapter 13. You would need to consult with an attorney to decide which is more fitting for your situation. Guidelines related to mortgage approval after bankruptcy are constantly changing. As a rule of thumb you want to be at least 3 years out from when the bankruptcy was discharged before looking to obtain financing. Immediately after the bankruptcy is discharged it’s best to make every effort to “reestablish” your credit. That involves getting a couple new tradelines in your name (credit card, personal loan, student loan…). Once you have shown a 24 month history of reestablished credit; you’re setting yourself up for success. 
  • Foreclosure and short-sale. Similar to bankruptcies; you’ll want to be at minimum of 3 years out from when the foreclosure or short-sale was closed. Again, guidelines are constantly changing on these items. Working on getting your credit reestablished as explained in the above bankruptcy explanation should be a high priority. Check here for changes on this.
  • Repossession. If you decide to “give your car back to the bank,” you can expect repercussions. Make sure that once it’s repossessed that there are no lingering debts affiliated with that. It’s a good idea to make sure all of your other liabilities are on time, and in good standing for 24 months prior to seeking home financing.
Guidelines and regulations are constantly changing.
President Obama’s recent state of the union address briefly touched on how that needs to be a priority. The fact is owning a home is generally a significant component in realizing the American Dream. Hopefully guidelines will loosen up a bit from the extreme government regulations that are currently mandated. In the mean time; use this information as a tool to set yourself apart from the average home buyer. With some preparation, you can get a mortgage for bad credit. 

A couple closing tips… 

Don’t overextend your credit limits.
If your credit cards are pushing their limits, then this can be a red flag for lenders. Try to keep your credit card account balances below 35% of your available credit limit. This may keep you from looking overextended.

Credit glossary word of the week: CHARGE-OFF

A debt that is declared by the creditor as being noncollectable. This means the lender considers the money it loaned to the borrower is lost. Lenders use this as a last resort, once all collection efforts have failed. A bankruptcy filing often results in several accounts becoming charged-off. Charge-off s usually lower credit ratings. Also known as bad debt, charged-off account, charged-off balance, charged to loss, charged to profit and loss.

 How to Build Your Credit to Buy a House

Watch Video:

Listen to Podcast:

E001: How to Build Credit to Buy a House