Mortgage and Portfolio Loan Guide

Do I qualify for a home loan?

Here are all the answers to the question “Do I qualify for a home loan?” The answer to that question is really a four part question regarding you income, credit, assets, and property.

The real questions to be asking are:

  • Does my income qualify me for a mortgage?
  • Does my credit meet mortgage requirements?
  • Are my assets enough to cover the required down payment, closing costs, escrows, and reserves?
  • Does the property I am looking to buy meet lender guidelines and requirements?

In this post I will cover the answers to all of those questions and more. You’ll know exactly what you’re up against when seeking mortgage approval.

Does my income qualify for a home loan?

When applying for a mortgage you have to think like an underwriter.

Regarding income, here is how an underwriter thinks: “does this potential borrower show consistency and stability with their income and employment history?”

In the mortgage world consistency is best demonstrated by providing proof of income for the most recent two year history. If your income is the same or more this year than it was last year, and the year before – that means your income is consistently increasing.

If your income is less last year than it was the year before, that means your income is “declining”. Declining income demonstrates instability, and could potentially cause an issue with approval unless there is a legitimate reason for the declining income.

If showing declining income it helps to show that you’re back on your feet by showing your year to date income is back on track to earn what you did in previous years.

If you are W-2 employee of a company your income will be based on the gross amount on your pay stub. If you are a salary employee it’s very simple.do I qualify for a home loan income

If you are an hourly employee your income is: your wage X average hours per week X 52 / 12.

If you recently received a raise, your income will be based on your most recent raise.

For incentive pay like commission, bonus, overtime – you will need a 2 year history of receiving that income in order to be able to demonstrate consistency/stability.

What if you are self-employed? See full article on how your income is considered.

The way the lender decides if you’re eligible for a loan is by calculating your income and measuring that against your monthly liabilities (including all items shown on credit, alimony/child support, and all real estate obligations). The underwriter divides your debt into your income (or debt to income ratio).

So if your debt is 4,000/month and your income is 8,000/month, you have a 50% debt-to-income (DTI) ratio.

Most lenders to not like to see debt-to-income ratio above 45%, but in some cases 50% DTI is accepted with strong compensating factors (high asset reserves, low loan to value ratio, etc.).

Does my credit meet mortgage requirements?

Credit = credibility of previous payment history.

You have 1 score from each bureau:

  • Transunion
  • Equifax
  • Experian

For a standard conventional loan, 620 middle credit score is needed. [For other loan types, there are cases where you can go as low as 500 credit score. Just ask.

So if you have scores of 650, 675, 690 – the 675 score is what is used.

Important Note: The scores that the credit bureaus report to mortgage lenders are different than what is reported to consumers who pull consumer reports. The scores that lenders see are almost always lower than what you might pull on CreditKarma.com.

CreditKarma.com is still a great site, and gives you something to start with when trying to get an idea of where you stand.

Aside from actual credit score, here are the things lenders look for on your credit report:

  • On time payment history (or lack thereof – aka late payments)
  • Length of credit established
  • Derogatory marks like collections, charge-offs, judgments, tax liens
  • Major credit events like bankruptcy, foreclosure, short sale

Payment History

It’s crucial to be able to show minimal late payments in the most recent 24 months, especially on housing payment history. Most traditional loans only allow one 30 day late payment in the last 12 months.

But there are alternative loan options for unique credit circumstances.

Length of Established Credit

In many cases there will be a need to show at least 12 months of established credit. However, there are exceptions.

If you have 10-20% down payment, >2 years on the job, and can prove rent history, it may be possible to get approved with less than 12 months credit history.

No Credit Score | No credit Historydo i qualify for a home loan credit

Some people just like to pay cash. Plain and simple. I get it.

For those who have no credit established, and no credit score, you may still qualify for a mortgage by using non-traditional credit approach.

A non-traditional credit report would consist of 3 accounts you pay toward that do NOT show on your traditional credit report.

Examples of non-traditional credit:

  • Rental payments
  • Utility payments (gas, electric, water, landline, home phone, cable)
  • Netflix/HULU
  • Child care
  • School tuition
  • Proof of 12 months savings
  • Gym membership
  • And more

If you have a legitimate (and consistent) 12 month payment history on an account there is a chance it may be considered by the lender in the overall decision to lend.

Derogatory Marks

For minor collections, there are cases where they do not need to be paid off prior to closing on your home loan. Medical collections are given some flexibility as well.

But if you have more than $1,000 in outstanding collections, they will most likely need to be paid prior to closing.

Judgments and tax liens must be paid prior to closing. The lender does not want to have to deal with those obligations potentially becoming a lien on the property/collateral.

These derogatory marks do not necessarily need to be removed from the credit report. Most of the time, the lender just wants legitimate proof or paper trail to confirm the obligation has been paid/satisfied/settled.

Disputed Accounts

When you dispute an account on your credit report because you disagree with the way it is being reported, the credit bureaus immediately disregard that account when calculating your scores.

The result of disputing an account is the credit scores go up. This is because the negative account that is being disputed is not being included in the overall scoring calculation.

For that reason, lenders will typically not allow a loan to proceed until the dispute has been removed, and new credit has been pulled. The logic is: if there is a disputed account, the credit scores are artificially high.

Major Credit Events

On most mortgage loans there is a waiting period between when a person has gone through a major credit event, and when they are eligible for new home financing. Below is a basic summary of what to typically expect as far as waiting periods are concerned. [there are portfolio loans where no waiting period is required]

  • Bankruptcy – Chapter 7
    • FHA – 2 year waiting period
    • Conventional – 4 year waiting period
    • VA – 2 year waiting period
    • USDA – 3 year waiting period
    • Portfolio Loan – No waiting period with 20% down payment if home was included in foreclosure.
  • Bankruptcy – Chapter 13
    • FHA – Must have 12 months on time payments and permission from trustee to enter new mortgage. Must be manually underwritten if less than 2 years.
    • Conventional – 2 year waiting period
    • VA – 1 year waiting period
    • USDA – 1 year waiting period
    • Portfolio Loan – No waiting period with 20% down payment
  • Foreclosure
    • FHA – 3 year waiting period
    • Conventional – 7 year waiting period (Unless property that foreclosed was included in bankruptcy. If home was included in BK, waiting period is based on bankruptcy discharge date)
    • VA – 3 year waiting period
    • USDA – 3 year waiting period
    • Portfolio Loan – No waiting period with 20% down payment
  • Short Sale or Deed-in-lieu
    • FHA – 3 year waiting period
    • Conventional – 4 year waiting period
    • VA – 3 year waiting period
    • USDA – 3 year waiting period
    • Portfolio Loan – No waiting period with 20% down payment

Keep in mind, guidelines change constantly. It would appear a portfolio loan is a good option if you’re back on your feet and don’t yet meet traditional waiting period requirements. More on portfolio loans here.

Do my assets meet home loan requirements?

When evaluating assets the underwriter is reviewing available funds for:

  • Down payment – The amount that you’re coming out of pocket to secure the home.
  • Closing costs – The fees associated with acquiring the home (appraisal, origination, title, closing, recording, etc.)
  • Escrows/prepaids (for taxes and insurance) – The amount set aside to account for taxes and insurance on the property
  • Reserves – The amount of left over available funds

The funds used to qualify must be “seasoned” in your account for 60 days to be eligible funds. Any large deposits that are not seasoned must be explained and sourced. Cash deposits are unacceptable because the source cannot be verified/confirmed.

If you have a property that you are simultaneously selling during the process of buying the new home, the proceeds of the sale of that previous home do not need to be seasoned. You will need to provide proof of sale of the home (purchase and sale agreement) as well as the closing statement prior to closing on the new home.

Reservesdo i qualify for a home loan assets

The logic of reviewing reserves is: if the borrower should unexpectedly fall on hard times, there is enough set aside to cover the mortgage payment for X number of months.

Showing adequate reserves helps strengthen the overall file.

Reserves can be from your traditional bank account, brokerage account, retirement account, etc. You cannot use a non-borrower’s account to show reserves.

Gift Funds 

For most loan types gift funds from family are acceptable. There are scenarios where a non-family member can gift the funds, but every lender is going to have a different interpretation of who is acceptable. For best results, just ask.

Non-Liquid Assets

Cars, RV’s, heavy equipment, beanie babies… are not liquid assets.

Vehicles and other items that can be easily valued, can be considered if sold and properly documented.

If you sell a car in order to qualify for a mortgage be sure to have kelly blue book value on hand, bill of sale, and copy of the check you received when you sold the vehicle. Having a full paper trail helps tremendously.

 

Does the property being financed meet lending guidelines?

There are an infinite number of reasons the property might not meet lender requirements.

I am going to cover some of the most common reasons the property can be the cause of denial with the lender.

Non-Warrantable Condo

When buying a condominium, not only does the borrower’s finances get evaluated, but the homeowners association is also closely reviewed.

The lender will order a “condo questionnaire” in order to evaluate the health of the association.

They’ll look for things like: completion status, investor concentration, pending litigation, and so much more.

More on non-warrantable condos here.

Repairs Neededdo i qualify for a home loan house

If the property is in disrepair, the lender will require completion of repairs prior to closing in most cases. Repairs needed will be determined based on appraiser’s comments in the appraisal report.

The repairs need to be completed by the seller, and a final inspection will be needed prior to closing to confirm completion.

If the repairs are fairly minor, there are many landers that will allow a “repair escrow”.

A repair escrow is where funds are set aside at closing to cover the cost of the repairs needed. Then the loan closes, and repairs are done after closing. A final inspection is completed when ready.

Typically this only allowed when repairs are no more than $5,000. With a repair escrow, 150% of the estimated repair costs are collected in case of unexpected cost overages.

Example: if the repairs needed are estimated to be $3,000, the actual amount collected for the repair escrow will be $4,500.

If the excess funds aren’t used, the difference will be refunded to the borrower or applied toward the principal balance.

For properties in need of major repair. There are renovation mortgages available on both FHA and conventional.

Unique Property Type

One of the most crucial parts of the appraisal report has to do with the appraiser being able to find recently sold homes that are comparable in size/condition/use that have sold within a reasonable distance.

If there are unique features to the property, the appraiser may have a challenge that cannot be resolved due to market conditions.

Even if there are comparables, some lenders simply do not allow unique property types.

Unique features that could be a challenge:

  • Berm homes
  • Properties that are not suitable for year round occupancy regardless of location
  • Agricultural zoned property
  • Condo hotels
  • More than 20 acres
  • Hobby farms
  • Leaseholds
  • Rustic log cabins
  • Working farms, ranches, or orchards

For unique property type financing, a portfolio loan may be a solution.

In Summary

There are four major pieces of the scenario to consider when asking the question “do I qualify for a home loan”?

Those pieces are: income, credit, assets, and property.

If any of your questions were left unanswered I strongly encourage you to reach out to me below and ask.

If I cannot help, I should be able to point you in the right direction at the very least.

self employed home loans

 

 

What is a Gift of Equity?

Sometimes it’s nice to be able to pay your rent to family because there is a mutual trust that already exists between tenant and landlord. It’s even better when you can buy your home from a family member. This is one of the cases where you can buy a home with zero down payment with use of a gift of equity.

In this article we’ll go over everything you need to know about how to buy a home from family with a gift of equity and zero down payment.

What is a gift of equity?

A gift of equity refers to the gift provided by the seller to the buyer in the form of existing home equity. In this type of scenario there is no exchange of funds. The seller simply agrees to take less net proceeds at closing, which allows the buyer to have instant equity while providing no down payment.

These types of transactions are common with parents who are selling their home to their child.

 

what is a gift of equity

 

Here is a basic example:

Jimmy has been renting from his parents for 2 years. Paying rent on time faithfully every month.

Instead of putting their home on the market, they agree to sell their home to Jimmy.

The home is worth $200,000 and his parents are looking to sell their home. They are only looking to net $150,000 out of the sale, which means they are willing to provide a gift of equity of $50,000. When the transaction gets to the closing table, instead of little Jimmy coming out of pocket 50K for down payment, the gift of equity is done. This means that he now owns a home that already has 25% equity.

What about closing costs?

Right, so being able to do zero down payment with a gift of equity is nice, but what about closing costs and escrows for taxes and insurance? Good question, glad you asked.

The nice thing about dealing with family is that you can talk things out and get a clear understanding of what the proceeds need to be. In other words, the parent and child can clearly communicate how much funds the parent needs to get at closing for this to make sense for them.

Once that is clearly understood, the sale of the home can be structured in a way to benefit all parties involved with complete transparency.

The way to get closing costs paid for without the buyer having to cover the costs is by adding seller concessions (or seller contributions) to the formal purchase agreement. This is where the seller gives a credit toward the buyer’s closing costs and escrows.

In many cases the seller credits can be up to 6% of the purchase price of the home. Which means that if the sale price is $200,000, the allowable seller concessions can be as high as $12,000. That amount should be more than sufficient to cover costs and escrows (depending on how much real estate taxes are in your area).

So let’s take a look at how that would apply to the case with Jimmy…

Same price as above, at $200,000. Instead of giving a gift of equity of 50K, the parents give a gift of equity of 40K. But now, on the purchase agreement they agree to provide $10,000 in seller concessions.

In this case the loan amount would be $160,000. The sellers still get net proceeds of $150,000, AND the buyer didn’t have to come out of packet to make it happen. It’s a win/win. The loan amount is $10,000 higher (roughly a $50/month difference in monthly payment), but the buyer didn’t have to deplete is assets to make it happen.

It’s basically a way to finance the costs, really just a matter of structuring the purchase agreement properly to meet everyone’s goals.

Important things to keep in mind.

Appraisal – The only way a gift of equity works is if there is actual equity that already exists. The lender is going to order an appraisal to get an opinion of fair market value. If you’re trying to sell your home for $200,000, but it only appraises for $150,000 then the gift of equity amount needs to be revisited, and the purchase agreement needs to be restructured accordingly. [more on appraisals here]

Documentation – The lender is going to need to verify everything (just like a normal purchase of a home). If the child has been renting, there needs to be legitimate proof of rent. If the child gave a deposit of any amount at the beginning of the lease, there is going to need to be a paper trail.

Acceptable Donor – When dealing with a gift of equity scenario, the seller an buyer need to be related. Here is the definition of an acceptable donor with regard to a gift:

“A relative, defined as the borrower’s spouse, child, or other dependent, or by any other individual who is related by blood, marriage, adoption, or legal guardianship; or a fiance, or domestic partner.”

As you can see, there is a little bit of room for discussion on that. There is a grey area. There are endless “what ifs” on this topic of “related”. Bottom line, don’t try to pull a fast one on the underwriter.  If you’re trying to do a gift of equity, it needs to involve a clear relationship like parent/child for example. Otherwise, there is a chance an underwriter could shoot it down.

Conclusion

Buying or selling a home with the use of a gift of equity can be a very advantageous route to take for a buyer and seller. The buyer doesn’t have to provide a down payment, and the seller gets the piece of mind of helping their family achieve the dream of home ownership while getting the proceeds they are seeking.

As always, transparency and communication is key to make the process as smooth and painless as possible.

I invite you to reach out.

mortgage loan officerIf you’re running into any challenges with getting this type of scenario put together, or the buyer doesn’t quite meet normal lending guidelines, you’re welcome to reach out to me with your specific questions.

You won’t be connected with an intern or someone in a call center, you will be connected with me directly.

If I cannot help, I should be able to point you in the right direction at the very least.

 

 

real estate investment loans

 

5 Awesome Advantages of Owning Real Estate

Buying a house isn’t for everyone.

The truth is, it’s kind of a pain in the you-know-what to be a homeowner sometimes. If the power goes out, it’s on you bro, better get a generator. If a window breaks, sorry dude, figure it out.

Even though there are some big responsibilities that come with owning a home, there are some excellent advantages worth mentioning!

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Your payment goes toward something.

Yup, it’s called a mortgage. Every month you pay that sucker, the balance of that home loan goes down (just a bit at first). The only time that isn’t true is if you have an interest only mortgage (not a ton of those still out there), where your payment only goes toward interest for the first X number of years. But for the majority of people, their house payment goes toward building equity and paying that bad-boy down.

The alternative? Pay rent (aka pay someone else’s mortgage for them). This leaves you with a lease agreement that you have to stick with, in a house you really can’t change to your liking. The result? You despise writing that rent check every month because you know that even if you did stay there for 30 years, you would still have next month’s payment due on the 1st. Keep in mind, rent typically increases every year. So not only achievement-18134_640would you be paying someone’s mortgage for them, but when it’s all said and done you’ll be paying a higher payment on something that has no liability attached to it. I know, I know, most people don’t rent in the same house or apartment for 30 years. But whether it’s 30 years or 3 years, do you really want your hard-earned money going into someones pocket and have nothing to show for it after 3 years?

I hear the chirping already… “Adam, not all homeowners have equity after a few years of owning. Heck, some were underwater on their homes in 2009 and they made mortgage payments for 10 years before that.”

Yes, you’re right. I am aware of that. Don’t forget, many people put themselves in that place because they used their home like an ATM. Taking cash out of their home to buy a shiny car, or to keep up with the Joneses. I agree with you… if you continue to cash in your equity, you won’t have any equity to speak of. Yes there were other factors that played into the housing crisis like people getting approved for loans they can’t afford, appraisers trying to meet the needs of lenders, and straight-up fraud. But the mid-to-late 2000’s housing bubble was an exception to the rule. Historically, housing prices move steadily (but reasonably) upward.

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Increased sense of pride.

Yes, too much pride can be a bad thing, but being a homeowner is confidence builder. The thought and preparation it takes to buy a home figure-25590_640requires a lot of guts and strategy.

Think about it… You are sitting in your apartment. Channel surfing. You “accidentally” leave it on HGTV while you reply to a few text messages. “Property Virgins” is on, and buying a house looks fun. You suddenly decide that you are capable of buying a home. You Google: How to buy a home. You find a blog that talks about home ownership, and now you’re feeling super geeked. You call a local Realtor, and she asks you if you’re pre-approved for a mortgage. “Pre-approved?. Umm not yet.” Your Realtor insists that you get pre-approved first, and get your ducks in a row.

You ask your friends and family who to call for a mortgage. The next thing you know you’re gathering up your financial identity and giving it to your mortgage guy. You find out there are a couple of things to work on, and it’s probably going to be about 6 months until it’s time to start looking for a home.

You spend the next six months getting your finances squared away, and following your loan officer’s guidance to a T.

  • Paying down your credit cards.
  • Making no large (unverifiable) deposits into your bank account.
  • Get a couple small collections deleted from your credit report.
  • Now you’re ready.

Your Realtor finds you a sick deal, and you make an offer. You negotiate a price that is a win/win for everyone as long as the seller is willing to do a few repairs that the inspector noted. You give your earnest money deposit. It’s game on. Appraisal is ordered. Thirty-ish days later you bring a crisp cashier’s check to closing for the rest of the funds needed. This was pretty much all of your savings, but you saved for this exact moment! To own your home! Now you have the keys, and you feel like you can sit at the big kids table at Thanksgiving this year.

It all started with a little channel surfing mixed with a dose of inspiration.

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Get more for your money.

dollar-499481_640In Brighton, MI and most of Michigan (if not all) you get more bang for your buck by owning your home instead of renting. Let’s look at a quick example. Here is an actual “for rent” listing on Craigslist right now:

$750 / 2br – 775ft22 BR Condo (Brighton)

Great Location. Beautiful updated 2 BR Condo in Hidden Harbour Condominiums opposite Meijer store in downtown Brighton. Central A/C, appliances, washer dryer in the building. No pets please. Water, hot water, trash pick up, Snow removal included in the rent. Available Dec. 1, 2014. Walk to shopping and near x-ways.

Here is an example “for sale” listing on Craigslist right now:

$59900 / 2br – 950ft2TOWNHOUSE for Sale in Brighton

2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath END unit offers extra windows and light, along with added outdoor living space. New Pergo flooring in kitchen and dining areas, also includes newer stove and frig. Newer windows throughout. Large Master Bedroom (16 x 12), and 2nd bedroom (11.5 x 10) both have mirrored closet doors, ceiling fans and lots of light. Finished basement with new glass block windows has built-in storage areas, along with a large separate laundry room. Neutral colors throughout home. Back door leads to private covered patio area, surrounded by green space & trees. Outside area is large enough to entertain and garden.

Running rough numbers on the second one, it looks like $596 including principal/interest/taxes/insurance/mortgage insurance/homeowners association dues

So for 125 more square feet of living space, you pay $154 less per month.

I pulled that up with a few mouse clicks, there are never-ending examples of this.

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Ability to make a house a home.

Take the above for rent listing for example. “No pets please.” It didn’t say no dogs over 30 lbs. It didn’t say no pit bulls. It didn’t say no snakes. Itpuppy-345334_640 said NO PETS.

Why are there so many restrictions on renting? Well, consider this for a moment. If you owned a home, and rented it out, would you want to give the tenant (renter) the ability to do whatever they wish with the property? No? Why? Because you never know how bad they will trash the home. Resulting in you (the owner) having to renovate the property once the tenant moves out. Who knows how much that will cost? Who knows how bad their 1-year-old boxer tear up the carpet? Well ultimately the owner will have to deal with it. So it’s in the owners best interest to be selective on what will be considered when renting out their property.

When you own your home… you decide. You decide on upgrades, pets, colors, etc. You get to make it yours.

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Tax deduction.

The tax deduction that you get from paying mortgage interest is in many cases the largest tax deduction for many homeowners. Unlike credit card and car loan interest that you pay, the mortgage interest that you pay is tax-deductible. Even wealthy borrowers who could pay off their calculator-158109_640mortgage 3 times over with their assets keep their mortgage because of the tax deduction that it brings.

This is a huge benefit for people who look to consolidate some credit card debt because not only does their overall monthly budget improve, but the interest that they pay results in a larger tax deduction. As I mentioned in the first advantage at the beginning, it’s not wise to use your home like an ATM, and take cash out multiple times just to buy stuff. But if you look at it from a common sense standpoint, many times consolidating debt into your mortgage makes good financial sense. If you find yourself refinancing every couple of years in order to consolidate your credit card debt, there is an issue. Might want to chop those cards up so that you don’t find yourself in the same position over and over.

This might be a helpful resource to answer some questions surrounding your possible tax deduction.

What do you think?

Across the United States it is more cost-effective to own than rent in suburban areas. Do you agree? Leave a comment below and tell share your thoughts.

Adam Lesner | Brighton, MI | Mortgage Loan Officer – NMLS 198818

The Secret to Spending Money Extremely Efficiently

Connecting with Matthew Love has been a great experience. He has brought a fresh perspective to light on the subject of money, and is an all around genuine guy. He was kind enough to share some perspective with me regarding his take on the most effective way to leverage credit, and pay down debt efficiently. Here is what he had to say:

The Power of Collateralization

futer cash

How to Spend Money Efficiently

Have you ever wondered if there is a more efficient way of making purchases? How can it be that we work so hard and never seem to get ahead?  What is it that people do differently to set themselves apart?  How can I get there?  While I don’t believe there is one answer, technique, or product that will create financial success, I do believe there is a process we can follow that will influence our decision-making at a young age to set us apart as we get older and (hopefully) wealthier.

Let’s look at a typical way purchasing a car, or even a student loan, using financing.

I find compoundthe car of my dreams and head to a lending institution, such as a bank, and ask for money.  I realize this might not be the best way to make the purchase, but the smell of a brand new car is un-beatable.  I talk with a banker and they will let me have the money to make the purchase, but in order to use their money, I have to qualify.  After a rigorous background check, housing check, employment check, etc., I finally qualify, but there is a catch.  I have to pay an interest rate THEY determine.  Either way, I want the car, so I make the purchase.  I have a new car by spending other peoples’ money at a cost, and I’m in debt.

Let’s look at what happens when I buy the car with cash.  Instead of buying the car today, I save the monthly payment I would have made to the bank.  Over the course of a few years I have accumulated enough money in an account which is compounding interest.  By paying cash I save paying interest, but it prevents me from earning any interest on the money I just spent.  An economist would say I lost opportunity to earn more because I spent on a depreciating asset.  I killed the forward momentum of the money by spending it!  I never got a chance to realize the full effects of compounding interest.

However, there is a third way. I can use collateral.  If I were to put my savings account up as collateral, I can borrow money at a negotiated interest rate and allow my money to continue the compounding curve! By doing this my full account value can continue to compound, while I pay an interest rate on a smaller amount used to pay off the car; I will have more control, use, and liquidity of my money during my lifetime!  The sooner we can understand how money works, the sooner we can let it work for our advantage.  So, what is your collateral capacity?

paying differently

Matthew Love is a member of Financial Architect Inc.  His work focuses on building wealth for young families.  Working with Matthew, his clients understand the principles of how money really works.

Reach Matthew directly: 847-767-5067 or Matthew@FinancialArch.com

Matthew Love - Financial Architects

financial architects

4 Things to Stop Doing as Soon as You’re Pre-Approved

Isn’t it fun getting a mortgage pre-approval?

You get your credit pulled by the nice guy in a tie at the bank. You tell him about all the glorious money you have to put down on your home. You drink coffee and explain how you make a clean salary, and you hardly ever use your credit cards…

Of course he is happy to print off your crisp, clean pre-approval letter. He connects you with the local real estate genius, and the house hunting begins.

All of the sudden your dog gets sick and you have to pay $900 to keep it alive. “Well sorry ole’ Sparky but I can’t dip into the family savings, let’s use the AMEX to keep the ticker ticking.”

A week later you finally sell your BMX racing bike on craigslist and you’re feeling good with a nice $1,500 deposit into the rainy day fund.

Jimmy from high school gives you a ring and asks you to be a partner in his new business venture, and you accept the offer. C’mon, YOLO.

There was a sweet deal going on at Buy Here, Pay Here, and you finally got the Bronco 4×4 you’ve always wanted.

Uh oh, why is my mortgage guy asking for a paper trail for this stuff? Any why has my credit score tanked? This new business is gonna kill it. What, do they want a blood sample too?

  • Don’t use your credit cards past 30% of you available balance. It’ll change your scores in a way you and your lender won’t like. Sometimes (depending on how long it takes to find a house) your credit may need to be pulled again.
  • No large deposits in your bank account that can’t be easily sourced. (anything other than salary income). Large deposits raise red flags and need to be sourced. What the lender wants to know: “where did it come from?”  “do you have mysterious liabilities we don’t know about that you’re paying back?”
  • Don’t change jobs. Can that wait while you make one of the biggest investments of your life? Consistent income helps strengthen the likelihood of your file being approved.
  • Stop buying stuff. When your lender pulls your credit they are taking into account all of your liabilities, and taking into account what your income is in order to calculate what you’re approved for. If your liabilities increase, there is a chance your pre-approval will decrease. Make sure to ask how tight your ratios are.

Remember, the lender is on your side (believe it or not). We WANT to earn your business. But if you decide to change your financial circumstances after you get pre-approved for a mortgage, just understand that there is going to be some leg work involved to put the pieces of the puzzle together.


E005: 4 Things to STOP After Pre Approval


Tip of the day: When you get pre-approved, provide all your stuff up-front. Tax returns, W-2s, pay stubs, bank statements. This will minimize room for error or misunderstanding.

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Get the pre-approval you’re looking for from me. You won’t be talking with some newbie. You’ll be talking directly with me, Adam Lesner. If it turns out I can’t help, I’ll usually be able to point you in the right direction at the very least.

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Do you have to prove your savings to buy a home?

The Asset Piece of the Mortgage Puzzle

There you are, Mr. Hotshot at the blackjack table. You sat down with a hundred bucks, now you’re up two grand. You’re feeling good, top of the world really, and decide maybe it’s time to call it a night. You cash in your chips with a smile on your assets gamblingface thinking how proud your wife is going to be for the first time in years. Things have been a bit rocky since back in ’06 when you bought her that vacuum for Christmas. But not this time. Today you’re a winner. With these winnings in hand, you finally have enough money saved to move out of mom and dad’s basement and buy a house! Monday morning comes around, and you’re devastated. Your buddy at Easy Peazy Funding has to break it to you that the $2,000 deposit that you made into your bank account needs to be sourced if you want a mortgage. There needs to be a paper trail proving where that cash came from. You’re confused because there is no way to prove you made that money from using mind power, and pure skill. When the denial letter comes in the mail your wife kindly throws your clothes into the front yard. She leaves a note saying something about California, and heading west. The rest is history.

Depressing right? Let’s try to make sure you’re doing all the right things to prepare for buying a home. In this portion of the “keeping your home loan process simple” series, the asset piece of the mortgage puzzle is given to you in a gift basket.

When you’re purchasing a home, get all of your financials in one place so they are easily accessible. You’ll need funds for down payment, escrow account (for taxes and insurance), closing costs, and general reserves. Along with all of your pay information, you’ll need bank statements, retirement statements, brokerage account statements, and proof of any other account you’re using to qualify.

Bank statement

  •  Be ready to provide 2 months consecutive bank statements, including all pages. If it says page 2 of 6 anywhere on the assets for mortgagepage, provide all 6 pages.
  • Make sure that your statement shows your name, address, bank name/logo, account number, balances, and activity on the account. If any of those items are missing you’ll need to provide more information. Many times an online print-off will show your account number, but not your name.
  • Non-sufficient fund (NSF) fees will be evaluated. If you show a habit of having NSFs, your lender may decide that pattern is an indication that you’re not ready to buy a home.
  • If the statement you provide is a shared account (someone other than you is also on the account), the individual you share the account with will need to provide a letter confirming you have full access to the funds.
  • Large deposits need to be sourced. If there are any deposits on your bank statement other than your normal income; you will need to provide a paper trail proving where those funds came from. All jokes aside, you may actually be able to use gambling winnings if the casino provided a slip or coupon confirming the amount won. If you sold a vehicle or jewelry you’ll need a bill of sale. Don’t accept cash from the buyer, ask for a check. Additionally, you’ll need to provide a 3rd party opinion (kelley blue book for example) of value in order to confirm the sale price was not unreasonably higher than fair market value. This is to prevent fraud. So Johnny can’t sell his ford escort to his “neighbor” for $10,000. There might be something fishy going on there in the eyes of your lender.

Retirement and Brokerage Accounts

  • If you’re liquidating retirement funds you should be able to print off a most recent quarterly statement. If you are taking out a loan against your 401k your lender will factor that liability into your debt-to-income ratio. In some cases you may have an additional tax penalty if you withdraw retirement funds prior the being 59 1/2.
  • Above and beyond a recent statement, you’ll need to provide proof the funds needed for closing have been liquidated. You’ll also need to show where those same funds were deposited into. It’s wise to deposit those funds into the same bank account that you’ve already provided statements for. The goal is to keep it simple, so putting those funds into a different account could open a new can of worms.

Gift Funds

It’s acceptable to receive gift funds to help with down payment. Each loan program has it’s own guidelines pertaining to gift funds, but here are a few general points to keep in mind:gift from family
  • The person “gifting” the funds needs to be a family member, or someone with an obvious close personal relationship (like a fiance).
  • You both will need to sign a letter confirming the amount and purpose of the gift funds. The letter will also need to confirm there is no expectation of repayment to the donor (the person gifting the funds). They will also need to show their ability to gift the funds by providing 2 months bank statements.

  Grants

Some states and communities offer grants to assist homebuyers with down payment. As long as the entity providing the grant is credible, the lender should accept the grant as an asset because typically a grant does not require repayment. Some grants require a homebuyer course to be completed by the borrower prior to being eligible for the grant. This is to ensure the individual is aware of the pros and cons of homeownership.
There are many unexpected expenses when buying a home. Cash is king, have your assets in place. Aside from lender requirements there are so many things to consider. Carpet, fence, paint, new locks, blinds, and so much more. If you feel like every penny is being scrutinized by your lender, you’re probably right, and it’s truly for your protection. If you feel like things are getting a bit too tight, it might be best to reconsider your price range.


A couple closing tips… 

Bank statements are valid for 60 days. If you’re house hunting for 5 months, send your lender new bank statements as they become available.

Do not overextend yourself. There will always be something that comes up that never crossed your mind. Leave yourself a cushion for those expenses so you can sleep at night.

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